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Indoor Projection Mapping by Students of the School of Science and Technology—on Kobe-Sanda Campus

Public Relations Office        April 15, 2014

Indoor Projection Mapping by Students of the School of Science and Technology


 Karakuri-do, an active learning group consisting of students of the School of Science and Technology, is presenting an indoor projection mapping show in the Academic Commons on the Kobe-Sanda Campus, from April 14 to 18, 2014. This is the first indoor projection mapping show to be presented at Kwansei Gakuin University.
 Projection mapping is the projection of images onto walls of buildings and the like used as a screen. It is now very popular. Unlike conventional outdoor projection mapping techniques, which use large areas such as building walls as the screen, indoor projection mapping techniques offer greater possibilities for the design and layout of objects on which the images are projected, therefore making it easier to create new images.

 In the show, a seven-minute trilogy is projected under the theme of “four seasons,” “Makura-no-soshi” (a classical essay written by Sei-sho-nagon) and “autumn leaves.” Images are projected on objects of variable sizes placed in a dark room. This is a show that is challenging to carry out, and created with elaborate efforts. The show includes the display of a model of a Kwansei Gakuin University building where projection mapping events that Karakuri-do previously presented are reproduced. Visitors seem to find the show interesting and enjoyable.
 Kanae Nishigaki (a junior at the School of Science and Technology), a member of Karakuri-do, says with enthusiasm: “It was difficult for us to calculate the distance between the projector and the objects used as screens and to fit the desired images onto the objects. But I am happy we were able to create an elaborate work. We’re planning to present another projection mapping show outdoors this December. We will do our best to create a more impressive work for the show.”

Indoor Projection Mapping by Students of the School of Science and Technology